Discovery museum – Southeastern Quilt Museum http://southeasternquiltmuseum.com/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 18:57:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://southeasternquiltmuseum.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Discovery museum – Southeastern Quilt Museum http://southeasternquiltmuseum.com/ 32 32 ExxonMobil Qatar and Qatar Museums announce sponsorship of new Dadu, Qatar Children’s Museum https://southeasternquiltmuseum.com/exxonmobil-qatar-and-qatar-museums-announce-sponsorship-of-new-dadu-qatar-childrens-museum/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 16:28:00 +0000 https://southeasternquiltmuseum.com/exxonmobil-qatar-and-qatar-museums-announce-sponsorship-of-new-dadu-qatar-childrens-museum/ ExxonMobil Qatar and Qatar Museums (QM) have entered into a sponsorship agreement for Dadu, the Children’s Museum of Qatar, with the signing of the company as a founding family member.

QM Chairman HE Sheikha Al Mayassa bint Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani, and ExxonMobil Qatar Chairman and CEO Dominic Genetti made the announcement during an official ceremony at QM earlier this week.
As part of this partnership, ExxonMobil Qatar will become the exclusive sponsor of the museum’s Sustainability and Valuing the Environment gallery, a space that will focus on the natural environment and biodiversity.
The gallery’s goals are consistent with those of ExxonMobil Qatar’s values ​​to protect Qatar’s natural environment and marine life – including its iconic dugong population – and educate students and the general public about the importance of sustainability for the future of our planet.
In addition, the gallery is linked to ExxonMobil Qatar’s commitment to the development of education – particularly in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects – to advance the goals. of the Qatar National Vision 2030 and its human development pillar.
In a statement, HE Sheikha al-Mayassa said, “ExxonMobil Qatar supports the ethics of Qatar museums in sustainability and environmental awareness. Once opened, the gallery will educate children and families about Qatar’s natural habitat and how we can all do our part to save the environment.
Genetti said, “The Qatar Children’s Museum will provide endless opportunities for learning and creative discovery, and we are proud to be part of such an important national project. We are also delighted to sponsor a space at the museum that will spark love and curiosity for nature and help children become aware of the environment and motivate them to take action to preserve it. We hope he will be very busy and wish him every success in the future ”.
ExxonMobil Qatar and QM have a common vision of preserving Qatari culture and heritage which is reflected in their collaborations. In June, ExxonMobil Research Qatar (EMRQ) and QM worked closely to present the highly successful Seagrass Tales, Dugong Trails – an exhibit that highlighted the cultural and environmental significance of dugongs – at the Qatar National Museum. ExxonMobil is also the platinum sponsor of Qatar – USA Year of Culture 2021 – a QM initiative.

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Escape room, like escaping from the museum https://southeasternquiltmuseum.com/escape-room-like-escaping-from-the-museum/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 01:14:00 +0000 https://southeasternquiltmuseum.com/escape-room-like-escaping-from-the-museum/

SMALL

“We discover the evolution of animals. How they were and how they became “ by Dunia Rahwan and Giulia Gattolin, with a preface by Sveva Sagramola (Gribaudo, 70 pages, 14.90 euros), is a book full of curiosities. Did you know that birds had teeth a long time ago? And which whales were walking? When they first appeared on Earth, the animals were very different from what we know today: how many adventures they went through and how many transformations they went through! Without these changes, today we would not have the biodiversity on which we can rely and which, however, is increasingly threatened. Protecting it is our duty. Through clear texts and surprising images, this book will make you discover how animals have evolved in history: giraffes, crocodiles, sharks and many others will no longer have any secrets. And, eventually, we will find out where we came from. Preface by Sveva Sagramola. Reading age: 6 years old.

“Farm animal” by George Orwell, illustrated by Quentin Gréban (Rizzoli, 25 euros) is a masterpiece that has become a classic. All animals are the same, but some are more equal than others. After rebelling against the owner and taking over the government of the farm, the animals believe their lives will improve. Soon, however, it happens that the pigs become the bosses, and one of them, Napoleon, the boss of all. One by one, the principles of the Rebellion will thus be forgotten …

“Nicky and Véra” by Peter Sis (Rizzoli, 18 euros) is the story of a discreet hero of the Shoah and the 669 children he saved. It is a story of commitment and courage, a story that cannot leave us indifferent. In December 1938, a young Englishman canceled his vacation in the mountains and left for Prague to help the thousands of refugees fleeing Nazism who had gathered in the city. His name was Nicholas Winton and, working day and night from a hotel room, he collected hundreds of names and photographs of children to be taken to safety, got the money, found families willing to welcome them to England. , organized trips, accompanied by official documents or counterfeit. In the spring and summer of 1939, as the dark shadow of Nazism spread over Europe, Nicholas managed to scare away nearly 700 children, mostly Jews, on eight trains bound for London. . Then when the war broke out and the borders were closed, he put all the papers away and never told anyone about it. Winton’s extraordinary feat was not discovered until fifty years later by his wife and brought to everyone’s attention on a TV show.

“Fairy tales” by Natalie Portman (Sonda, 64 pages, € 16.90) brings together, among the colored pages, three great classics: The hare and the turtle, The three little pigs, The city mouse and the country mouse.

WAY

“Escape Room – Can you escape the museum?” “ by Dr Gareth Moore and Beatriz Castro (Gribaudo, € 16.90) is a mysterious story: your footsteps echo in the deserted gallery of ancient Egypt and a shiver runs down your back. There is something very strange about this museum, you better go out right away. But the doors don’t open, they’re locked! You must find a way to escape… before it’s too late! Live the Escape Game experience at home with this interactive book. Puzzles, codes, puzzles, riddles … and many objects to build await you: these are the clues you need to solve the games, access the next museum rooms and find the exit as quickly as possible. Can you solve the mystery and escape the museum? Includes over 30 buildable 3D objects. Reading age: from 9 years old.

“All the flowers that you are – 12 stories for my sister” by Iacopo Melio, with a story by Guido Catalano, illustrated by Agnese Innocente (Rizzoli, 190 pages, 16 euros) with Iacopo Melio, 28, human and civic rights activist. On the eve of an important day, he writes to his sister Costanza. Iacopo di lavoro collects and tells the stories of others, stories of ordinary fragility and extraordinary resilience, stories of sometimes lost or subversive people, of people who ask for answers or simply listen. They are the knights with the stain and the fear, as he likes to call them, and they are the ones who keep going despite everything, who always try, who never stop dreaming and getting involved. So are the twelve protagonists of the stories in this book, illuminated by the colors and poetry of Agnese Innocente and conceived as a walk in the midst of emotions: we, readers, picking with Costanza one flower after another, walking along the paths of several lives. we come home with a handful of beauty to shake, a bigger heart, and the hope that we live in a better world every day. Among the twelve flowers of Costanza, there is one sown by Guido Catalano and one by Barbara, the mother of Iacopo and Costanza.

“Roby in search of the legendary pet” (Fabbri editori, 144 pages, € 15.90) ​​is the story of Roby, who has just arrived in town, but has already made friends at school. He also found a boy, Francy, who is a bit awkward but very, very good. But Roby has a great desire: he would like a Pet, a puppy, everything for him, like his friends. One day finally, thanks to a school competition, he will have the possibility of winning one … but this will only be the beginning of a great adventure, which will lead Roby to face enemies near and far and to discover the special powers that everyone, absolutely everyone, we have. You just need to know how to use it …

FAT

“Rutka – The Secret Girl” by Joanna Fabicka, illustrated by Mariusz Andryszczyk (Rizzoli, 226 pages, 16 euros) is a fascinating story of friendship and discovery, where past and present dance together, are the desire to live and the infinite possibilities of this treasure that is childhood. In the courtyard at 13 Rybna Street in Lódz, Zosia is bored to death. But when the strange Aunt Róia comes into her life and quickly settles into her heart, the world around her changes. The walls of the buildings no longer appear to be so chipped, the willow tree in the center of the courtyard is no longer so curved, and among the branches an unfamiliar red braid looms. It’s Rutka, a neighbor Zosia didn’t know she had. With her, magic, madness and surreal adventures follow one another, and the imagination sweeps without limits. But, as they run hand in hand through the city, sad music flows under their feet and a silent tale unfolds before our eyes: the walls, the shadows, the mysterious images evoke the stories of pain of the Jews during the Second World War. There is the White Lord swallowing butterflies, and there is the Radegast station, from where wagons loaded with people leave for the planet Diamond. A world that emerges from the memories of those who survived, but who cannot gain the upper hand.

“The flight of the lark” by Anthony McGowan (Rizzoli, 140 pages, 15 euros) with Nicky and Kenny, who walk in the moor with Tina, their Jack Russel. It was the father who suggested this spring outing, a way to spend a few hours outside and have a little fun. Indeed, in a few days, his mother, who left the house many years ago, will come to visit him, and Kenny, who is a little late, is very tense. The two brothers take the bus, set off for the path, but soon it starts to snow. It was only meant to be a walk, a breeze, and instead they are surprised by a fatal storm.

“Welcome to the Anthropocene” by John Green, the author of “The Fault of the Stars” (Rizzoli, 350 pages, 17 euros), is situated in the current geological era, where the work of man has profoundly rethought and influenced the planet. Starting from the very successful podcast in America, enriched and transformed in this volume also due to the pandemic, John Green reviews, with a rating of 1 to 5 stars, different aspects of our anthropocentric planet: from the QWERTY keyboard to the velociraptor, to passing for the Internet, sports myths and video games, to the Penguins of Madagascar. Artificial products like carbonated drinks, natural species whose habits have been irreparably modified by human action, phenomena which influence humanity like Halley’s comet: the author’s critiques compose a true symphony, in a complex and complex whole. rich in detail. John Green’s talent for storytelling shines brighter than ever and leads us to look at our present and the world around us with different eyes.

FOR ADULTS

“Greece 2013-2020. Newspapers of the second millennium » by Michele Buzzi (Book Sprint editions, 228 pages, € 16.90) brings together seven travel stories set in the Greece of the second millennium, from mass tourism places to the inaccessible monasteries of Mount Athos, from traditional taverns on the beach to more transgressive places of Mykonos, through the sunsets, the wind, the light and the magical colors of the Cyclades and the many islands of the Aegean Sea. An aimless wandering between corners of paradise and economic crisis, modernity and tradition, beach bars and the ancient Acropolis, towns, churches and palaces built over the centuries by the Greek, Roman, Venetian, Genoese, Turkish and Italian conquerors. A long journey to Ithaca, at a time when the world and the culture of the West seem to be coming to an end, a return to the origins, to the places where all that we are and what we have learned began: the art, philosophy, music, physics and metaphysics.

“Nutrition and nutrition of dogs and cats” by Aa. Vv. (Edagricole, 238 pages, 36 euros) illustrates the basics of nutrition and food management for dogs and cats, offering students and professionals, eager to know more about the subject, a simple text, but complete and scientifically precise. In Italy today there are around seven million dogs and as many cats who have now fully acquired the status of members of the families with which they live. In recent decades, the life expectancy of dogs and cats has increased dramatically thanks to the greater sensitivity of their owners, improved veterinary care and a more suitable diet. Nutrition is playing an increasingly important role in maintaining the health and well-being of pets throughout their lives.

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Cleveland Museum of Natural History celebrates 100 years https://southeasternquiltmuseum.com/cleveland-museum-of-natural-history-celebrates-100-years/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 13:09:41 +0000 https://southeasternquiltmuseum.com/cleveland-museum-of-natural-history-celebrates-100-years/

Video previously released in spring 2021 shows segment of Kickin ‘It With Kenny at the museum

CLEVELAND (WJW) – The Cleveland Museum of Natural History turns 100!

To commemorate, the museum inaugurated a new exhibition, 100 years of discovery: the past, present and future of a museum.

It opened on Friday.

It’s an interactive journey taking you through some of the most awe-inspiring moments in its history and you’ll get a glimpse of what the future may hold for you.

Here’s what you can discover in the new exhibit:

  • Walk in the shoes of the Clevelander visionaries who paved the way for the museum’s founding in 1920
  • Take the helm of a schooner on a 1923 South Atlantic expedition
  • Mush with Balto Across an Alaskan Snow Landscape
  • See bald eagles through the eyes of a naturalist
  • Stand face to face with a dinosaur
  • Map the possibilities of the next 100 years

Discover the exhibition during normal museum hours, Tuesday to Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Public holidays are every Friday until December 17 until 9 p.m.

The museum is now offering $ 1 admission for those in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).

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Tipperary Bog Ancient Book’s Journey to Museum Treasure https://southeasternquiltmuseum.com/tipperary-bog-ancient-books-journey-to-museum-treasure/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 16:11:00 +0000 https://southeasternquiltmuseum.com/tipperary-bog-ancient-books-journey-to-museum-treasure/ One summer day in Tipperary while peat was being extracted from a bog, a bud sprouted from the freshly cut earth. The discovery sparked a five-year conservation journey to retrieve and preserve what lay beyond: a 1,200-year-old book of psalms in its original cover.

Bogs across Europe have thrown away all manner of relics from the ancient past, from naturally preserved bodies to containers with butter over a millennium old, but the discovery in 2006 of a manuscript from the entire early Middle Ages, buried in a damp time capsule for so long was unprecedented, the National Museum of Ireland said.

The book opened upon discovery to reveal the Latin words in ualle lacrimarum (in the valley of tears), which identified it as a book of psalms. One particularly unexpected feature was the vegetable-tanned leather cover with a papyrus reed lining, suggesting that the monks may have had commercial ties to Egypt.

Fragments of the ancient manuscript found by an excavator operator while digging peat moss in Faddan More Bog, County Tipperary. The manuscript is the only one of its kind to have been discovered in the world. Photo: National Museum of Ireland / PA

“It always amazes me,” said John Gillis, chief curator of manuscripts at Trinity College Dublin, which houses the Book of Kells, the Book of Armagh and 450 other medieval Latin manuscripts.

“It was by far the most exciting and interesting project I have ever undertaken – and to put that in context, I am surrounded by these iconic manuscripts.”

Ten years after being on display at the National Museum in Dublin, the Faddan More Psalter is one of Ireland’s top 10 treasures and is now the subject of a 340-page book from the institution documenting every step of the process of preservation “terrifying” for future academics. .

Museum President Catherine Heaney and National Museum of Ireland Guardian Maeve Sikora discuss the Ardagh Chalice with Queen Silvia of Sweden, during Her Majesty's visit to the National Museum of Ireland - Archeology.  Photo: Julien Behal at the National Museum of Ireland - Archeology.
Museum President Catherine Heaney and National Museum of Ireland Guardian Maeve Sikora discuss the Ardagh Chalice with Queen Silvia of Sweden, during Her Majesty’s visit to the National Museum of Ireland – Archeology. Photo: Julien Behal at the National Museum of Ireland – Archeology.

“The fact that such a fragile organic object survived for a millennium in humid conditions, the fact that it was noticed … and the fact that a complete bifolio survived and allowed Gillis to verify the codicological details of the Psalter are all against the grain. “said Maeve Sikora, keeper of Irish antiquities at the National Museum who supported Gillis in the work.

Faddan More Psalter cover
Faddan More Psalter cover

The process of stabilizing the book out of the bog, drying it, then unhooking and unfolding the pages when possible was laborious. Archaeologists placed the “conglomerate” of crushed pages, leather and turf in a walk-in cold room in the museum at 4C. But there was no manual in the world to guide Gillis on how to go about it.

“I spent the first three months collecting the mass from the refrigerator, bringing it to my lab and looking at it, trying to figure it out before I could start any kind of intervention work. Because once you bother him, you actually lose evidence, ”said Gillis.

“While the bog was responsible for its very poor condition, it was also responsible for locking it down in its original state.” The initial examination was limited in order to alleviate further trauma. CT scans and X-rays to find 3D structures have been excluded out of concern that they will accelerate degradation.

Several years were spent safely drying the fragments of the Faddan More Psalter and reassembling them
Several years were spent safely drying the fragments of the Faddan More Psalter and reassembling them

After trying sophisticated versions of freeze-drying, vacuum sealing and drying with blotting paper, Gillis opted for a dehydration method using a vacuum chamber installed in the museum’s laboratory for four years to minimize shrinkage and decay. .

It would take two years before all the folio fragments were in a dry and stable condition before the arduous task of dismantling could begin, a process recounted in the book published later this month, The Faddan More Psalter, The Discovery and Conservation of a Medieval Treasure.

“It was absolutely terrifying,” Gillis said of the responsibility he felt.

“I heard from someone at the British Museum that there was a photo of the mace on the walls of a staff area with the words ‘if you think you have a bad day ahead of you ..’ . ”You had this agonizing scenario of disturbing this material, which meant losing evidence, when the goal was to try to get as much information as possible.

Many of the spaces between the iron letters had dissolved in the bog, leaving an alphabet soup of several thousand stand-alone letters. It would take months after the drying process to put them all together, in order on the right pages.

“The rewards when you slowly lifted a shard and suddenly that little piece of decoration popped up, especially the yellow pigment they were using. It would kind of make you shine, ”said Gillis.

“And you’d say, ‘Wow, I’m the first person to see this in 1,200 years. So that kind of privilege made all the sleepless nights and puzzles worthwhile. It was the purest conservation I have ever achieved. There is no repair, I have not attached anything new. Everything I have done is captured and stabilized.

– Guardian

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Discovery Museum to host COVID-19 clinic to help Bridgeport overcome vaccine hesitancy https://southeasternquiltmuseum.com/discovery-museum-to-host-covid-19-clinic-to-help-bridgeport-overcome-vaccine-hesitancy/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 21:35:00 +0000 https://southeasternquiltmuseum.com/discovery-museum-to-host-covid-19-clinic-to-help-bridgeport-overcome-vaccine-hesitancy/

Bridgeport’s Discovery Science Center and Planetarium will host a COVID-19 vaccination clinic on Friday. It will also offer bilingual services to parents who are reluctant to get vaccinated.

The center has partnered with community groups around Bridgeport to offer bilingual mobile sessions to answer questions about vaccines for non-native English speakers.

Erika Eng, executive director of the center, said the clinic was an opportunity to try to reduce vaccine reluctance in the community.

“We want to make sure the community knows that we are here strictly in a scientific capacity. We are here strictly to offer immunity to the community, ”she said.

The vaccination clinic will be operated by Griffin Health for children 5 years and older and residents 18 years and older eligible for a booster.

The center will also offer free entry the day after Thanksgiving as part of their “Thankful friday” program.

“So it’s like a fun, engaging place like, go down the stairs, take your quick shot, then let’s go see a cool planetarium show. Let’s go take a picture with Santa Claus. Let’s go make some ornaments. Eng said. “I think it’s a great way to engage the community and open the door to these questions and conversations.”

The center reopened in September under the direction of the University of the Sacred Heart, which participated in the renovations of the building. It had been closed during the pandemic.

The University of the Sacred Heart is the holder of the WSHU public radio license.

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Botticelli, Goya, Greco, Delacroix from the Louvre to the National Gallery https://southeasternquiltmuseum.com/botticelli-goya-greco-delacroix-from-the-louvre-to-the-national-gallery/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 18:59:56 +0000 https://southeasternquiltmuseum.com/botticelli-goya-greco-delacroix-from-the-louvre-to-the-national-gallery/

The first periodical exhibition of the new National Gallery brings its collaboration with the Louvre museum and at the same time inaugurates a new room of 2000m² for the public.

When we turn on the phone ourselves and take a selfie, what are we really doing? We claim a share in immortality. Before the advent of technology and the discovery of photography, this piece of immortality could be claimed by the portrait. Bust, miniature, painting, jewelry: the representation of important figures or not, takes on different manifestations throughout history, manifestations which define and are determined by the socio-political and topographical conditions of each period.

The historical investigation of the meaning of the portrait and its social significance is the real stake of the exhibition. “IN SEARCH OF ATHANASIA – THE ART OF PORTRAIT IN THE LOUVROS COLLECTIONS” which will be hosted at the New National Gallery from November 29.

Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes (1746-1828) Portrait of Luis Maria de Sistouy y Martέnez (1788-1842), 2nd Baron of Menglana 1791

This is clearly seen in the sections that structure the report:

Feverish preparations by the gallery’s technical staff to be all ready on November 29

More than 100 works have been selected from the Louvre collections to come to Athens, and to grasp the difficulty of the project we rely on the data presented by the director of the National Gallery Marina Lambraki-Plaka: the insurance value of a single work can exceed 20 million euros. The exhibition is organized, not chronologically, but around the different functions attributed to the portrait over time, to culminate in its fourth and final part concerning the democratization of the portrait. The emphasis was not placed on harmonizing the works, as many times unlike these.

Just before the portraits are placed on the purple walls of the exhibition

The exhibition “IN SEARCH OF ATHANASIA – THE ART OF PORTRAIT IN THE LOUVRE COLLECTIONS” follows the exhibition “Paris / Athens” which was inaugurated at the Louvre museum to commemorate the XNUMX anniversary of the start of the struggle for national independence from Greece.

Basia Baketea

Workshop of François Clouet (d. 1520-1572) Portrait of Hercules-Francis (1554-1584), duc d’Alanson d. 1566-1567
François Boucher (1703-1770) Portrait of Jean Antoinette Le Norman d’Etiol, Marquis de Pompadour, 1750
. Véronèse (Paolo Caliari, dit) (1528-1588) Portrait of a woman, La Belle Nani day Around 1560
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‘It was terrifying’: the journey of an ancient book from the Irish bog to the museum’s treasure | Museums https://southeasternquiltmuseum.com/it-was-terrifying-the-journey-of-an-ancient-book-from-the-irish-bog-to-the-museums-treasure-museums/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 18:27:00 +0000 https://southeasternquiltmuseum.com/it-was-terrifying-the-journey-of-an-ancient-book-from-the-irish-bog-to-the-museums-treasure-museums/

ohn summer day in Tipperary, as peat was being extracted from a bog, a bud sprouted from the freshly cut earth. The discovery sparked a five-year conservation journey to retrieve and preserve what lay beyond: a 1,200-year-old book of psalms in its original cover.

Bogs across Europe have thrown away all manner of relics from the ancient past, from naturally preserved bodies to containers with butter that are over a millennia old, but the discovery in 2006 of a manuscript from the entire early Middle Ages, buried in a damp time capsule for so long was unprecedented, the National Museum of Ireland said.

The cover of the psalter, almost intact, complete with three buttons Photograph: National Museum of Ireland

The book opened upon discovery to reveal Latin words in ualle lacrimarum (in the Valley of Tears), which identified it as a book of psalms. One particularly unexpected feature was the vegetable-tanned leather cover with a papyrus reed lining, suggesting that the monks may have had commercial ties to Egypt.

“It always amazes me,” said John Gillis, chief curator of manuscripts at Trinity College Dublin, which houses the Book of Kells, the Book of Armagh and 450 other medieval Latin manuscripts. “It was by far the most exciting and interesting project I have ever undertaken – and to put that in context, I am surrounded by these iconic manuscripts.”

John Gillis at work
John Gillis at work. Photograph: National Museum of Ireland

Ten years after being on display at the National Museum in Dublin, the Faddan More Psalter is one of Ireland’s top 10 treasures and is now the subject of a 340-page institution book documenting every step of the process of preservation “terrifying” for future academics. .

“The fact that such a fragile organic object survived for a millennium in humid conditions, the fact that it was noticed … and the fact that a complete bifolio survived and allowed Gillis to verify the codicological details of the Psalter are all against the grain. “said Maeve Sikora, keeper of Irish antiquities at the National Museum who supported Gillis in the work.

The pre-conservation psalter - lines of psalms clearly visible
The pre-conservation psalter – lines of psalms clearly visible Photograph: National Museum of Ireland

The process of stabilizing the book out of the bog, drying it, then unhooking and unfolding the pages when possible was laborious. Archaeologists placed the “conglomerate” of crushed pages, leather and turf in a walk-in cold room in the museum at 4C. But there was no manual in the world to guide Gillis on how to go about it.

“I spent the first three months collecting the mass from the refrigerator, bringing it to my lab and looking at it, trying to figure it out before I could start any kind of intervention work. Because once you bother him, you actually lose evidence, ”said Gillis.

“While the bog was responsible for its very poor condition, it was also responsible for locking it down in its original state.”

A page exposed for the first time in 1200 years
A page exposed for the first time in 1200 years. Photograph: National Museum of Ireland

The initial examination was limited in order to alleviate further trauma. CT scans and X-rays to find 3D structures have been excluded out of concern that they will accelerate degradation.

After trying sophisticated versions of freeze-drying, vacuum sealing and drying with blotting paper, Gillis opted for a dehydration method using a vacuum chamber installed in the museum’s laboratory for four years to minimize shrinkage and decay. .

It would take two years before all the folio fragments were in a dry and stable condition before the arduous task of dismantling could begin, a process recounted in the book published later this month, The Faddan More Psalter, The Discovery and Conservation of a Medieval Treasure.

Letters collected from the mass of peat bog and vellum
Letters recovered from the mass of peat bog and vellum. Photograph: Valerie Dowling / National Museum of Ireland

“It was absolutely terrifying,” Gillis said of the responsibility he felt. “I heard from someone at the British Museum that there was a photo of the mace on the walls of a staff area with the words ‘if you think you have a bad day ahead of you ..’ . ”You had this agonizing scenario of disturbing this material, which meant losing evidence, when the goal was to try to get as much information as possible.

Many of the spaces between the iron letters had dissolved in the bog, leaving an alphabet soup of several thousand stand-alone letters. It would take months after the drying process to put them all together, in order on the right pages.

The
The “built-up area” as found in a Tipperary bog. Photograph: National Museum of Ireland

“The rewards when you slowly lifted a shard and suddenly that little piece of decoration popped up, especially the yellow pigment they were using. It would kind of make you shine, ”said Gillis. “And you’d say, ‘Wow, I’m the first person to see this in 1,200 years. So that kind of privilege made all the sleepless nights and puzzles worthwhile.

“It was the purest conservation I have ever achieved. There is no repair, I have not attached anything new. Everything I have done is captured and stabilized.

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Tiny Japanese sculptures at NY Jewish Museum tell a story of Jewish family’s resilience https://southeasternquiltmuseum.com/tiny-japanese-sculptures-at-ny-jewish-museum-tell-a-story-of-jewish-familys-resilience/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 00:38:42 +0000 https://southeasternquiltmuseum.com/tiny-japanese-sculptures-at-ny-jewish-museum-tell-a-story-of-jewish-familys-resilience/

New York Jewish Week via JTA – Edmund de Waal believes objects, like families, are diasporic. They start in one place and end in another, accumulating stories.

A master ceramist who exhibits his work internationally, de Waal is the author of the award-winning 2010 bestseller “The Amber-Eyed Hare: A Hidden Legacy”, a memoir on the rise and fall of the world. banking and fine arts dynasty of his European Jewish family. .

Now the subject of an exhibition that opened on November 19 at the Jewish Museum in Manhattan, the book has captured the world’s attention for its graceful and original narrative, evoking the lost worlds of pre-Holocaust Europe in through material objects and the stories they continue to tell.

These objects are on display at the museum: family photos, letters, souvenirs and works of art from the family collection, including paintings by Jean-Honoré Fragonard, Berthe Morisot, Claude Monet, Gustave Moreau and Pierre-Auguste Renoir.

At the heart of the exhibit is the eponymous hare, which is part of a large collection of netsuke, tiny Japanese figurines intricately carved in ivory and wood. Inherited from the author, whose Dutch-born father was Anglican Dean of Canterbury, the netsuke inspired his research and represents the rise, breakup and resilience of the family.

“There’s this thing about tactility, things, what’s in them,” de Waal said in an interview from his London studio last week. “I honestly feel this idea that when you do something and pass it on, there is a transfer of energy, emotion and imagination. I firmly believe that objects tell stories. If you are obsessive enough, you can discover the stories they might tell.

He continued, “No story is simple. When you try to tell a complex story, like a family story, which is about memory and emotions and things that are explained and things that are hidden, it s it is about secrets and silences as much as about things that are transmitted.

In memorial style, the exhibition traces the history of de Waal’s paternal family, the Ephrussians, an influential Jewish family whose roots were in Berdichev, a village in the Pale of Settlement in what is today the central and western Ukraine. In 1840, Charles Joachim Ephrussi went to Odessa, where he was very successful in the grain trade, then to Vienna, where the family further increased its wealth, prestige and philanthropy.

In the 1870s, a grandson of the family patriarch, also named Charles Ephrussi, art critic and collector (cousin of the author’s great-grandfather), acquired a collection of 264 netsuke in Paris and keeps them alongside the paintings of his friends, including Renoir. . The figurines were probably admired and handled by Charles’ friend Marcel Proust, who was visiting his Paris living room, before being sent as a wedding gift to a cousin Ephrussi in Vienna.

Various netsuke figurines from the collection of the family of Waal, exhibited at the Jewish Museum in Manhattan as part of the exhibition “The Hare with the Amber Eyes”. (Jewish Museum / via JTA)

In 1938, the Nazis looted and then occupied the great Viennese palace of Ephrussis, and family members were persecuted, exiled and killed. The netsuke were secretly hidden in a mattress by a loyal family helper. After the war, when the netsuke were rediscovered, the author’s grandmother took them to England, and later his great-uncle took them to Japan, where Edmund first saw and touched this ” very large collection of very small objects “in 1981.

At the Jewish Museum, the amber-eyed hare and other miniatures, which de Waal recalls as “seductively touchable”, are behind glass. Most are signed by the artists who created them.

“I hope that the intimacy of the exhibition allows you to feel and to feel that you are very close to them. You can’t touch them, but you can smell them, ”he says. He describes it as an immersive exhibition.

“The delicate excavation process is part of the whole idea of ​​the exhibition,” he said. “It’s about discovery… a real attempt at storytelling. “

Visitors to the exhibit will hear de Waal read the memoirs on an audio guide while learning about the netsuke and other artifacts.

They include a silk damask Torah parochet (Torah ark curtain) made from a family member’s wedding dress and a nose clip, or glasses, made of glass and metal. The glasses belonged to Viktor von Ephrussi, born in Odessa in 1860 and died stateless in 1945.

A silk damask Torah parochet (curtain) was made from the wedding dress of a member of the Ephrussi family, c. 1833. (Donated to the Stadttempel, Vienna, by Hermann Todesco Collection of the Jüdisches Museum Wien / via JTA)

Among the netsuke are a persimmon with a ladybug, a snake on a lotus leaf, three playing mice, and a monkey eating a peach. There is also a 1978 portrait of de Waal’s father, Victor de Waal, who the author says looks rabbinical.

Elizabeth Diller de Diller, Scofido + Renfro designed the exhibit. Daughter of Holocaust survivors, she worked on Bringing Memories off the Page for 10 years with de Waal.

When asked to imagine what it would be like to display at the Jewish Museum, with so many artifacts he has seen now gathered in one place, de Waal said, “It’s an extraordinary thing, beautiful and lyrical to see something again with new eyes. For me, it is incredibly painful and poignant. There are things I first saw 40 years ago in my uncle’s apartment in Japan, or 50 years ago in my grandmother’s house.

He says he continues to talk to those who have passed away. “Just because they’re dead doesn’t mean you’re not in a conversation yet,” he said.

Behind him in the studio are neatly tidy shelves of many books, and on a Zoom call he points out a few volumes of Rilke’s poetry that belonged to his grandmother and will not be in the show. He moves his computer screen and points to a large installation on a nearby wall, with porcelain vessels arranged in a display case, around a poem by Paul Celan.

De Waal speaks with poetry and parsimony, like his prose and like his art.

“I always wanted to be a poet. Poetry is in everything I do. In my facilities. I read poetry all the time. He recently set up a poetry library for a cancer support center in England and will roll out the idea across the country.

Several years ago de Waal donated most of the netsuke collection to the Jewish Museum in Vienna on a long-term loan.

“This is exactly the right place for them,” he says. Referring to the power of storytelling, he continues: “They can work really hard, talk about the diaspora, about what happened in Vienna. Her family auctioned off 79 more, raising money for refugee charities.

“We wanted to do this while my father, who is 92, is alive. We have decided to honor the fact that we are a refugee family. We have raised a huge amount of money. It’s storytelling too, ”he said. “You are not a passive spectator in this story, but an active participant. These stories are not over yet.

Ivory Netsuke, the amber eyed hare in the title of Edmund de Waal’s family memoir. (Lostrobots [CC BY-SA 4.0] via Wikimedia Commons)

“People say, ‘So you’ve moved on. The answer is, you cannot move on. [The story] is still ongoing, troubling, unresolved. He kept some netsuke.

When I ask what a netsuke looks like in his hands, he replies, “It’s a real fun experience. There is an expectation of what something looks like. You might know all about dimensionality. You move it around and always discover something else. There is a magnificent moment of delight, when you discover a coiled rat tail or acrobats doing extraordinary things with their limbs. We are always surprised by objects, it’s joy.

For de Waal, writing and artistic creation are intertwined passions. Best known perhaps for his white porcelain vases, he often shapes assemblages, shifting light and space between his delicate and translucent creations. He has also created in situ installations in museums and libraries around the world, notably the Frick in New York and – currently on display – at the Nissim de Camondo museum in Paris.

He is also the author of “The White Road” on the history – and his fascination with – porcelain. His latest book is “Letters to Camondo”, about another Jewish dynasty whose members lost their freedom, property and life to the Nazis.

For the 58th Venice Biennale in 2019, de Waal created an exhibition in two parts: one at the Jewish Museum of the Venetian Ghetto and the second, a ‘library of exile’ built inside a building. 16th century on the Grand Canal. It included nearly 2,000 books by writers in exile, in 70 languages, from 52 countries. On walls covered with liquid porcelain, de Waal inscribed the names of libraries lost across the world, including those in Sarajevo, Mosul and Aleppo, the rabbinical libraries in Lublin and Warsaw, and the library of his great-grandfather in Vienna.

After traveling to other museums, the “Library of Exile” is now in its permanent headquarters in Mosul, Iraq, serving as the foundation for a new university library replacing what was destroyed.

“The Hare with the Amber Eyes” is on display at the Jewish Museum, 1109 Fifth Avenue at 92sd Rue, from November 19, 2021 to May 15, 2022.

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Clarksville’s Customs House Museum December 2021 Exhibitions, Activities https://southeasternquiltmuseum.com/clarksvilles-customs-house-museum-december-2021-exhibitions-activities/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 01:43:01 +0000 https://southeasternquiltmuseum.com/clarksvilles-customs-house-museum-december-2021-exhibitions-activities/

The Customs Museum and Cultural CenterClarksville, Tennessee – The Customs House Museum and Cultural Center is located in historic downtown Clarksville, Tennessee. Come explore an entire city block with large gallery spaces filled with art, science and history.

Some of the events in December at the Museum are Familiar: Le Petit Voyage: Little Works of Paul Harmon, Customs House Christmas Village, Noel Night, Little Explorers: Holiday Cookie Creations, Discovery Saturday! Create Christmas tree ornament, Huff & Puff Express model trains.

Customs museum exhibitions

Le Petit Voyage: Small Works of Paul Harmon
December 5 – February 6 | Harvill Gallery

This collection of small oil paintings is a tribute to the small amateur landscapes that can be found in Parisian flea markets. Paul Harmon is the recipient of many major international painting awards and his work is well represented in galleries, museums and collections around the world.

Jim Diehr: Visual songs, many verses
Until January 30 | Squatting gallery

Jim Diehr is a ceramic artist from Clarksville who works with oil, acrylic, watercolor, wood, stone and clay to create works based on life experiences. This expansive multimedia exhibit is a mix of new pieces and familiar favorites, including a new collection of cloud paintings and several whimsical sculptures.

John Guider: Travels
Until January 30 | Orgain & Bruner Galleries

In 1779, John Donelson embarked on a river voyage that would lead to the founding of Nashville. John Guider followed 240 years later, capturing contemporary images of Tennessee waters in a boat of his own making. The photographs of his trip show us where we came from and where we could go.

Customs Christmas Village
Until January 1 | Lobby

This large collection of porcelain pieces was assembled by Jimmy and Sue Drye of Clarksville and donated to the Museum by their children in their honor. A miniature train passes through the lights and moving parts of the village.

Interactions: Paintings by Judy Lavoie
Until January 2 | Jostens Gallery

A wide variety of themes inspires Judy Lavoie to paint. Interesting textures inspire her, as do delicate colorful flowers and brilliantly lit landscapes. “By exaggerating the colors, or sometimes by distorting them from reality, I aim to preserve a moment in time, by recreating the subject in my own way.”

Start your engines! A celebration of racing in Montgomery County
Until December 31 | Kimbrough, Lane of Hand and Memory

Sponsored by TriStar Beverage and MPG Transport

The Museum expands its Challenge and Champions with this multi-gallery exhibit showcasing Montgomery County’s auto racing history and the local legends that shaped the sport. Start your engines! highlights racing cars, artwork, historical memorabilia and video footage of personal stories of locals who established motor racing in the region.

Customs museum events

Christmas night
December 2, 5:00 p.m.–20h00 | Free event

Celebrate the holidays with fun and special discounts at Seasons: The Museum Store! Enjoy holiday treats, shows, a take-out activity, F&M Bank Huff & Puff Express model trains and a very special guest from the North Pole. Receive 15% off your entire purchase; members get a 25% discount.

Museum programs

Little Explorers: Holiday Cookie Creations
December 3, 10, 17 meeting between 10:30 am-12:30pm
From 2 to 5 years old, with an adult

Free with membership or paid entry | Hudson classroom

Have fun making all kinds of cookie shapes with Play-Doh and party cookie cutters. Create and take home a giant cookie tree that you can decorate with holiday stickers, gems, glitter, and other festive adornments.

* All parents must participate and supervise their children. Activities may include items that pose a choking hazard.

Saturday discovery! Create a holiday tree ornament
December 4 and 18, meeting between 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.
Kindergarten and up, with adult

Free with membership or paid entry | Family art studio

Get into the holiday spirit by creating and decorating a tree ornament using Model Magic plasticine and all kinds of festive decorations, like holiday stickers, gems, glitter and candy. glittering ribbons.

* All parents must participate and supervise their children.

Screening of the film “Voyage of Adventure” with John Guider and Jeff Sellers
December 5, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Free with membership or paid entry | Geraldine Brame Turner Auditorium

Join exhibiting artist John Guider and Tennessee State Museum Director of Education Jeff Sellers for a special screening of the NPT documentary Adventure Travel: Tracing Donelson’s Journey. An open question-and-answer session will follow the film.

Museum Discovery Quest
Free with membership or paid entry | Developed for school-aged children
Take It N ‘Make It free activity

Explore the museum’s exhibits with your family in creative ways with Museum Discovery Quests – fun, self-guided “treasure hunts” that pique children’s curiosity and capture their attention. There are several different themes on offer, and all include a free Take It N ‘Make It activity kit for kids to do a fun project at home. Sign up for a Perks Pass to win a free Seasons: The Museum Store prize after completing three quests.

Huff & Puff Express Model Trains
Exhibition open every day | Volunteer members of the train crew run trains
Sundays from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. and Wednesdays from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Enjoy one of the region’s largest model railroad networks with a miniature castle, UFO, and scenic landscape. Interact with the miniature world by moving automobiles and flying helicopters. The model train exhibit is open daily and the themes change with each season.

Seasons: the museum shop

Holiday Sale
Offer valid until December 24, 2021

Find special gifts and Christmas stockings at Seasons: The Museum Store! Receive 15% off your entire purchase; members get a 25% discount. Spend $ 100.00 or more and receive a free CHMCC 2021 decoration.

Closure of the museum

Landing of the explorers
Reopening January 2022

Explorers Landing is closed for renovations. It will reopen in January 2022. Children’s play items will be available at the Coca-Cola Café while Explorers Landing is closed. The Family Art Studio will remain open during this time and children’s programs will also continue.

Xmas

The Museum will be closed on Saturday December 25 to celebrate Christmas.

New Years Day

The Museum will be closed on Saturday January 1 for New Year’s Day.

About the Customs Museum

Customs museum and cultural centerLocated in the heart of historic downtown Clarksville, Tennessee, the Customs House Museum and Cultural Center is the second largest general museum in the state. The original part of the building was built in 1898 as a US post office and customs office for the thriving tobacco trade. Incorporating a number of architectural styles, the original structure is one of the most photographed buildings in the region.

With over 35,000 square feet of the area’s best hands-on activities and special events… people of all ages agree – the Customs House Museum is well worth a visit!

The Explorer’s Gallery is packed with fun, learning, and whimsy in Aunt Alice’s attic, McGregor’s Market and Kitchen, and of course, the Bubble Cave! Finally, get on board to see our fantastic model trains. Our volunteer engineers “roll on the rails” every Sunday afternoon from 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm.

Normal museum hours are 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Sunday. Admission for adults is $ 7.00, seniors and college IDs $ 5.00, 6-18 year olds $ 3.00 and under six and museum members are free.

The Customs House Museum is located at 200 South Second Street. For more information call 931.648.5780 or visit their website at www.customshousemuseum.org

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Two other passengers sue Bath museum over capsized schooner https://southeasternquiltmuseum.com/two-other-passengers-sue-bath-museum-over-capsized-schooner/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 21:38:04 +0000 https://southeasternquiltmuseum.com/two-other-passengers-sue-bath-museum-over-capsized-schooner/

The Mary E, a schooner built in Bath in 1906, rests on its side as the crews work to stabilize the ship and bring all passengers down to safety. Photo courtesy of Paul Kalkstein

Two other passengers who were aboard the Mary E when it capsized in July have filed lawsuits against the Maine Maritime Museum, saying the museum is responsible for the injuries they sustained in the incident.

Allison and Thomas Poirier allege the Mary E was “unfit for the intended voyage, in poor condition, unsafe and seaworthy, poorly maintained and at risk of capsizing and sinking,” according to separate court documents filed in district court the United States. in Portland on November 12.

The action comes after another passenger filed a complaint against the museum in October.

The Poiriers state that the vessel was not seaworthy and that the master and crew of the schooner were “unfit, incompetent, poorly experienced, poorly trained, understaffed, thus rendering the vessel unsafe and unfit for service. navigation, thereby creating a reasonably foreseeable risk of capsizing and sinking. “As a result,” say the Poiriers, “their injuries were caused” solely by the negligence, recklessness, recklessness, abandonment, fault, neglect or neglect “of the museum and its employees.

On July 30, the Mary E capsized while on a cruise with 15 passengers and three crew on board. The 73-foot schooner capsized in the Kennebec River around 5:30 p.m. near the Doubling Point Lighthouse in Arrowsic, according to Bath Police Chief Andrew Booth.

All passengers were rescued by Bath Iron Works security, Sea Tow and Bath Police. Two people were taken to Mid Coast Hospital in Brunswick, Coast Guard Lt. James McDonough said.

Allison Poirier claims to have “sustained serious injuries including, but not limited to, a fractured left foot and psychological injuries” during the capsize.

Allison and Thomas Poirier both reportedly felt “pain, anxiety, shock and physical, mental and emotional suffering, and continue to do so to this day” as a result of the incident, according to their court documents.

According to court documents, the two passengers seek damages for “conscious pain and suffering”, emotional and psychological stress, medical bills and “other [financial] losses that discovery may reveal.

The Poiriers are represented by lawyers Stephen Koerting of Kelly, Remmel and Zimmerman and Timothy Schweitzer of Hofmann and Schweitzer. Neither Koerting nor Schweitzer immediately returned requests for comment on Monday regarding what the Poiriers are asking for in compensation.

Maine Maritime Museum spokeswoman Katie Spiridakis declined to comment on the Poiriers’ costumes, but said: “The safety of the passengers of the Mary E, as well as all museum guests, is of the utmost importance. . “

Allison and Thomas Poiriers’ claims come less than a month after another Mary E passenger, Karen Baldwin, filed a similar lawsuit against the museum in October. In his lawsuit, Baldwin alleges that the museum is responsible for his injuries because the Mary E was not seaworthy and the ship’s crew was poorly trained, among other allegations.

Baldwin’s lawsuit was the first brought against the museum after the capsizing. The museum denied allegations last week that it was responsible for the capsizing of the schooner and the injuries Baldwin sustained in the incident.

The three lawsuits also dismiss a lawsuit filed by the museum with the U.S. District Court in Portland in an attempt to avoid potential liability related to the incident.

According to court documents filed on August 20, the Bath Museum claimed it was not responsible for the “loss, damage, injury and destruction” suffered during the capsizing because it “exercised due diligence in returning the vessel in question “seaworthy and safe” before and during the cruise on July 30.

Allison and Thomas Poirier argue that the capsizing of the Mary E occurred as a result of the “careless, willful, callous and reckless conduct of the museum which allowed the vessel Mary E to go to sea in an unseaworthy and dangerous condition, with a crew unfit for navigation, unfit for service and intended purpose ”, according to their court documents.

In the museum’s court record, the organization says the historic schooner “suffered an overturn,” meaning the boat tipped onto its side to the point where its masts were level or underwater. Spiridakis said the museum is still awaiting the results of the Coast Guard’s investigation into the causes of the capsizing.

The Coast Guard did not return requests for comment on the completion of that investigation.

The museum also claimed that the Mary E was worth $ 150,000 after the incident, according to the museum’s complaint.

Allison and Thomas Poirier, however, asserted that “the proposed valuation of the vessel underestimates its value and that the court should order (the Maine Maritime Museum) to have a fair, adequate and prompt appraisal of the value of the vessel at time of the accident. “, According to court documents.

The Mary E was built by Thomas Hagan in 1906 at a Houghton shipyard, where the Bath Iron Works is now located. For 38 years, the two-masted schooner operated as a fishing and trading vessel before being sold in 1944 to become a trawler.

The ship was abandoned in 1960 and sank three years later in Lynn Harbor, Massachusetts, after a hurricane.

In 1965, William Donnell of Bath bought the schooner for $ 200 after seeing an advertisement in a commercial fishing magazine. Donnell brought the ship home for restoration where it was used as a passenger schooner in Maine’s Windjammer fleet before being sold to the Maine Maritime Museum in 2017 for $ 140,000.


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